Social anxiety test (LSAS-SR)

The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) is a Self-Report (SR) test that measures your level of social anxiety. This social anxiety test helps you determine whether or not you have social anxiety disorder (also called social phobia).

Social anxiety refers to the anxiety that a person feels in social situations. At its core, it’s the fear of being judged negatively by others. It’s the fear of being embarrassed and humiliated in social situations.

It’s normal for people to feel anxious in certain social situations but for those with social anxiety disorder, the anxiety is so overwhelming that it impairs important aspects of their lives.

For example, they may fear attending job interviews and hence prevent themselves from landing a job. Or they may be too afraid to initiate social interactions and, thereby, miss out on forming relationships.

People with social anxiety do what they can to avoid social situations, even though they know it’d be better for them if they did. There’s a difference between willingly avoiding social interactions you don’t want to be part of and avoiding social interactions you want to be part of. The latter is a sign of social anxeity.

Interestingly, people with social anxiety may even convince themselves they don’t want to participate in a social situation, even though deep down they know they do. You have to be mindful of that.

Taking the social anxiety test

The LSAS-SR scale assesses the role social anxiety plays in your life. The test is slightly different from many other psychometric tests in that it has two sub-scales covering two aspects of social anxiety- anxiety and avoidance.

This allows taking into account all combinations of the two factors. For instance, you may feel tremendously anxious in a situation, but you find that you no longer avoid it as much.

The test consists of 24 questions. You’re supposed to answer each question twice. First, you need to indicate how much anxiety you feel in that particular situation. Second, you need to indicate how often you avoid the situation.

The anxiety aspect ranges from None to Severe while the avoidance aspect ranges from Never to Usually. Never means 0% of the time, Occasionally means 1-33% of the time, Often means 33-67% of the time, and Usually means 67-100% of the time.

Try to base your answers on the past week or two as much as possible. For situations you’ve never encountered, ask yourself what you’d do in that hypothetical situation. Answer the questions honestly. If you have social anxiety, it may creep into the test and motivate you to answer dishonestly.

That’s no use since we don’t store your results in our database. The test results will be visible only to you. Also, no personal information will be taken. Though the test is clinically administered and has strong validity and reliability, you’re advised to seek professional help for a thorough diagnosis.

Social anxiety test

1. Telephoning in public (anxiety).
1. Telephoning in public (avoidance).
2. Participating in small groups (anxiety).
2. Participating in small groups (avoidance).
3. Eating in public places (anxiety).
3. Eating in public places (avoidance).
4. Drinking with others in public places (anxiety).
4. Drinking with others in public places (avoidance).
5. Talking to people in authority (anxiety).
5. Talking to people in authority (avoidance).
6. Acting, performing or giving a talk in front of an audience (anxiety).
6. Acting, performing or giving a talk in front of an audience (avoidance).
7. Going to a party (anxiety).
7. Going to a party (avoidance).
8. Working while being observed (anxiety).
8. Working while being observed (avoidance).
9. Writing while being observed (anxiety).
9. Writing while being observed (avoidance).
10. Calling someone you don’t know very well (anxiety).
10. Calling someone you don’t know very well (avoidance).
11. Talking with people you don’t know very well (anxiety).
11. Talking with people you don’t know very well (avoidance).
12. Meeting strangers (anxiety).
12. Meeting strangers (avoidance).
13. Urinating in a public bathroom (anxiety).
13. Urinating in a public bathroom (avoidance).
14. Entering a room when others are already seated and nobody has to move seats for you (anxiety).
14. Entering a room when others are already seated and nobody has to move seats for you (avoidance).
15. Being the center of attention (anxiety).
15. Being the center of attention (avoidance).
16. Speaking up at a meeting (anxiety).
16. Speaking up at a meeting (avoidance).
17. Taking a written test (anxiety).
17. Taking a written test (avoidance).
18. Expressing a disagreement or disapproval to people you don’t know very well (anxiety).
18. Expressing a disagreement or disapproval to people you don’t know very well (avoidance).
19. Looking at people you don’t know very well in the eyes (anxiety).
19. Looking at people you don’t know very well in the eyes (avoidance).
20. Giving an oral report to a group (anxiety).
20. Giving an oral report to a group (avoidance).
21. Trying to pick up someone (anxiety).
21. Trying to pick up someone (avoidance).
22. Returning goods to a store (anxiety).
22. Returning goods to a store (avoidance).
23. Giving a party (anxiety).
23. Giving a party (avoidance).
24. Resisting a high-pressure salesperson (anxiety).
24. Resisting a high-pressure salesperson (avoidance). E.g. listening to a salesperson for too long.

Reference

Liebowitz, M. R., & Pharmacopsychiatry, M. P. (1987). Social phobia.